Fox Shooting At Night 5-20x ATN X-Sight II

Date Posted:26 September 2019 

I have no lights on when spotting except the spotlight and a 4inch light bar in the bull bar. I shoot close to 6000ac and use the spotlight to spot the foxes while driving around the property.

Equipment:   

  • Tikka T3 .204 and .223 more the .204 on fox’s 
  • 5-20 XSight II
  • T67 After market IR
  • FoxPro Inferno with an extension horn speaker bolted to the bullbar
  • Home made  window rifle rest
  • 9” HID Roof Mounted PowaBeam Spotlight
  • Olight M3X-UT Torch

I have no lights on when spotting except the spotlight and a 4inch light bar in the bull bar. I shoot close to 6000ac and use the spotlight to spot the foxes while driving around the property. Once I spot a fox I turn my 4x4 ute to the side to where I seen the fox so I can get a good swing on the rifle rest with the rifle in case it has moved from where I spotted it first.

Then I turn everything off so its pitch black turn my FoxPro on with the volume on 12 to 14 depending on how far away it is, if closer than 150m I turn it down more otherwise it scares them rather than brining them in or making them stop and look. I  use either the Babee Cottontail Distress call or Baby Red Fox Distress Call or Baby Rabbit Distress Call or Vixen In Heat Call depending on the season to bring them in.

I then place the rifle on the rifle rest  (I have already got the Xsight on and in Night Vision Mode and focused the Xsight to 100m) turn the IR on and start scanning for the fox once I have spotted it I then push the record button and I just sit there and watch and wait to see if the fox is going to come in or not, if it starts to come in I let it come into around 100m metres and turn the FoxPro off with luck the fox will stop and start to sniff around and listen to see if it can hear the call again or smell his prey this is the point I drop it.

If it doesn’t come in I sit and observe what its doing whether it be chasing mice, moths, frogs or eating something or just trotting along marking its territory once I’ve observed it for about a 30 seconds I then pick the right opportunity to drop it but usually if you have the caller going they will at one stage stop and listen to the caller and sometimes you may need to change the call to get their attention. These fox’s are the hardest to predict as to when it will stop and to get your shot off. Once you have had your shot remember to turn your IR off to conserve the battery and push your record button to switch off the video recording.

Recovery of the fox is probably the hardest thing to do when using Night Vision I have found that if you can identify something through the ATN X-Sight close to where you dropped it say a stump a big tuff of grass a stick a rock or if you can line something up from where you shot from to a fence post or a tree or stump or a rock and walk that line it makes it a little easier and a good torch is must.  I use a Olight M3X-UT torch or you could go the way of a hand held thermal imager like the little Seek hand held or there is ones available for Android or Apple phones that plug into the USB of the phones or the Guide 510p is another reasonably priced thermal hand held.

If you shoot with mates it makes it a little easier while keeping an eye on where you dropped your fox through the X-Sight get your mate to switch the spotlight on and swing it around to where you dropped the fox its easy when there is not much grass around but certain times of the year the grass can hide your fox and they are not easy to find in long grass this is when a good torch or a hand held Thermal imager comes in very handy and remember no Pic or Vid it didn’t happen :)  

Hope this helps in your endeavours to hunt fox’s at night with the ATN X-Sight II


Good luck from, 

Peter Nobes     


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